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National Poetry Month Resources in GALILEO

Are your students studying rhythm and rhyme for National Poetry Month? From the ancients to recent Pulitzer Prize winners, students can find poetry criticism, poet biographies, full-text poems, and more in Literary Reference Center. And, when they are trying to figure out what onomatopoeia means, Literary Reference Center also includes a literary glossary for that.

For a broader search for middle and high school students, just type a poet’s name, a type of poetry, or the words, poet* or poetry criticism, into the Discover GALILEO search box to find articles and more.

If you’re looking for a poem for Poem in Your Pocket Day on Thursday, April 18, 2013, here’s a quick tip for finding poems. In Literary Reference Center, go to Advanced Search, leave the search field blank, and then limit your search to Poem in the Document Types section. Click the Search button, and you have thousands of poems at your fingertips.

Elementary and middle students can find fun poetry activities in SIRS Discoverer. Search for “poetry” and look for the red “a” code that indicates articles with activities. Students will also find editorially-selected websites and articles about poets and poetry.

Students of all ages can also write a poem about their own hometown and create a digital story to share their personal narratives in the activities outlined by the Where I’m From in GALILEO lesson plan. See the GALILEO site for the lesson plan, poem template, GPS alignments, guides to resources and tools, and an example video and poster.

Teachers, media specialists, and other school personnel can find classroom activities and lesson plans in ERIC. Search for “poetry and activity” and limit by grade level in Advanced Search. Check both ERIC@eric.ed.gov and ERIC@EBSCOhost – each may have different items in full text. Professional Development Collection also includes research articles and practical guidance for the teaching of poetry. Just search for “poetry study,” “poetry slams,” or a favorite poetry-related term.

Find plenty of interesting Georgia poets in the New Georgia Encyclopedia. Browse to Literature > Poetry to see the list. Several of the poets have video and audio clips included with the article, so don’t miss David Bottoms talking about metaphor or the reading of Sidney Lanier’s “The Marshes of Glynn.” Students can also read about Georgia poets, Alice Walker and Judith Ortiz Cofer as well as Natasha Tretheway, who is the current poet laureate for the United States.

See the archived Poetry Resources in GALILEO webinar in the Archived Sessions section of GALILEO Training and download the handout from the Presentation and Materials page.

Please Contact Us if you have questions or comments or if you need to report problems.

Courtney McGough
GALILEO Support Services
Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia

Some links may not work off site. Log in to GALILEO first for access.

Express Links for Databases Mentioned in this Post:
Literary Reference Center: http://www.galileo.usg.edu/express?link=zblr
SIRS Discoverer: http://www.galileo.usg.edu/express?link=zssd
ERIC (at http://www.eric.ed.gov): http://www.galileo.usg.edu/express?link=zeri
ERIC (at EBSCOhost): http://www.galileo.usg.edu/express?link=zber
Professional Development Collection: http://www.galileo.usg.edu/express?link=zbpd
New Georgia Encyclopedia: http://www.galileo.usg.edu/express?link=ngen
Find All Your Express Links (what’s this?)

Poetry Resources in GALILEO

Are your students studying rhythm and rhyme? From the ancients to recent Pulitzer Prize winners, students can find poetry criticism, poet biographies, full-text poems, images, and more in Literary Reference Center. And, when they are trying to figure out what onomatopoeia means, Literary Reference Center also includes a literary glossary for that.

If you’re looking for a poem for Poem in Your Pocket Day on Thursday, April 26, 2012, here’s a quick tip for finding poems. In Literary Reference Center, go to Advanced Search and type “poem” in the search field (or a topic that you like) and then limit your search to Poem in the Document Types section. Click the Search button, and you have thousands of poems at your fingertips.

Elementary and middle students can find fun poetry activities in SIRS Discoverer. Search for “poetry” and look for the red “a” code that indicates articles with activities. Students will also find editorially-selected websites and articles about poets and poetry.

Students of all ages can also write a poem about their own hometown and create a digital story to share their personal narratives in the activities outlined by the Where I’m From in GALILEO lesson plan. See the GALILEO site for the lesson plan, poem template, GPS alignments, guides to resources and tools, and an example video and poster.

Teachers, media specialists, and other school personnel can find classroom activities and lesson plans in ERIC. Search for “poetry and activity” and limit by grade level in Advanced Search. Check both ERIC@eric.ed.gov and ERIC@EBSCOhost – each may have different items in full text. Professional Development Collection also includes research articles and practical guidance for the teaching of poetry. Just search for “poetry study,” “poetry slams,” or a favorite poetry-related term.

Find plenty of interesting Georgia poets in the New Georgia Encyclopedia. Browse to Literature > Poetry to see the list. Several of the poets have video and audio clips included with the article, so don’t miss David Bottoms talking about metaphor or the reading of Sidney Lanier’s “The Marshes of Glynn.”

See the archived Poetry Resources in GALILEO webinar in the Archived Sessions section of GALILEO Training and download the handout from the Presentation and Materials page.

Please Contact Us if you have questions or comments or if you need to report problems.

Courtney McGough
GALILEO Support Services
Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia

Some links may not work off site. Log in to GALILEO first for access.

Express Links for Databases Mentioned in this Post:
Literary Reference Center: http://www.galileo.usg.edu/express?link=zblr
SIRS Discoverer: http://www.galileo.usg.edu/express?link=zssd
ERIC (at http://www.eric.ed.gov): http://www.galileo.usg.edu/express?link=zeri
ERIC (at EBSCOhost): http://www.galileo.usg.edu/express?link=zber
Professional Development Collection: http://www.galileo.usg.edu/express?link=zbpd
New Georgia Encyclopedia: http://www.galileo.usg.edu/express?link=ngen
Find All Your Express Links (what’s this?)

Using Poll Everywhere to Craft Poetry

Until September 28th, I am hosting the Ashley Bryan Traveling Exhibit of Illustrated Africana Children’s Literature featuring the artwork of Shadra Strickland.   This exhibit showcases 8 works of art from the books White Water, Bird, A Place Where Hurricanes Happen, Our Children Can Soar, and Eliza’s Freedom Road.  There is also a curriculum guide that incorporates the art and books into lessons about making text to text and text to self connections, response to literature, and more.  I took these lessons and wondered how I might adapt them to various kinds of learning that I try to support in my media center.

One of lessons invites students to write “Where I’m From” poems from the perspective of a character in the story or artwork.  I wondered how I might support students in writing a collaborative “where I’m from” poem rather than individual poems, so I turned to Poll Everywhere

 

Poll everywhere allows you to create an open ended or multiple choice questions that students can respond to in a variety of ways:  poll everywhere website, texting, tweeting.  With a free educator account, you can receive up to 40 responses per poll and the responses feed into a real-time screen.  The responses can be downloaded into an Excel file, used in a word cloud, or scrolled through on the poll everywhere site.

For my lesson, I shared George Ella Lyon’s original “Where I’m From” poem as well as a template that pointed out pieces of the poem such as phrases, everyday items, foods, etc.  Then, students thought of lines that might be in their own poems and shared them with partners or with the whole group.  We moved into reading White Water by Michael S. Bandy & Eric Stein; illustrated by Shadra Strickland.  This book details an African American boy’s curiosity with what it might be like to drink water from the “whites only” fountain during segregation.  All along the way, we paused and thought about possible lines that the main character in the story might write in his own “Where I’m From” poem.

Students then moved to computers where I had the Poll Everywhere site pulled up with the question “My line in our where I’m from poem is…”.  Each student thought of one line for the poem.  The teacher and I conferenced with students about their lines to look for spelling and repetition, and then each student submitted their response.  We reconvened in front of the smart board to read our poem, which was already waiting for us on the screen.  Finally, we took the words of our poem and pasted them into Tagxedo to make another version of our collaborative poem as well as to look for the words that we used the most and least.

There are numerous uses for Poll Everywhere, but I loved the fact that it could support a collaborative writing effort with a class.  The whole process took us less than 45 minutes to complete.

Here is a final poem from a 2nd grade class:

Where I’m From:  A Response Poem to the book White Water by Michael S. Bandy & Eric Stein; illustrated by Shadra Strickland

Mrs. Brink’s Class

I am from I know everything
from tricking my grandma.
from White Water at a water fountain in town.
from 6 blocks away from the bus stop.
I’m from drinking out of a colored water fountain.
from telling a lie to the bus driver.
from I can do anything
from drinking lots of water because fresh water is good.
I AM FROM
I’m from not being able to drink the white water
from pretending to be sick.
from that good ol’ time of riding the bus to town, waiting to drink water.
from boy you better not do that
I’m from white people sitting in the front seat
from going to town with my grandma
from trying to get white water because I thought it was fresh and cool.
from nasty muddy gritty yuck!
from I can do anything
I’m from
I’m from a water fountain
I’m from I can do anything

Andy Plemmons

School Librarian

David C. Barrow Elementary

Athens, GA

http://barrowmediacenter.wordpress.com

http://www.clarke.k12.ga.us/webpages/aplemmons

Happy Poetry Month 2011

Poetry month is here!  We’ve already seen some great posts on the GLMA blog to get us thinking about this creative month:

Poetry Resources in Galileo

Looking Ahead to National Poetry Month

Later this month, I’ll share some of the products we’ve made and celebrations we’ve had in the Barrow Media Center, but I wanted to take a moment to wish all of you a Happy National Poetry Month and to pose some questions for thought:

  • In what ways are you incorporating poetry into the lessons you are already teaching in your libraries?
  • What kinds of poetry are your students creating in the media center?
  • How are you celebrating the joy of reading and writing poems in your library?
  • How are you honoring student work?
  • How are you incorporating technology for both inspiration and creation of poetry?
  • What special poetry events have you planned in your school (poetry picnics, poem in your pocket day, contests, etc.)?
  • How are you sharing poetry beyond the walls of your library?

Here are a few of the things that we will be doing over the next month in the Barrow Media Center.  Some things are already underway while others are still be fleshed out.

  • PreK Poetry:  PreK students are writing their own shape poems on large cut-outs of symbols from their classroom and will video record their final poems to upload to Teacher Tube.
  • Joyce Sidman collaboration:  A few groups of students will be studying the poems of Joyce Sidman and writing poems inspired by her writing.  These poems will be created in multiple ways from using Photo Story to simply writing them on paper.  The poems will be featured at Joyce Sidman’s keynote speech at the NCTE conference in November.
  • List Poetry:  Using Georgia Heard’s collection, Falling Down the Page, students will study list poetry, write list poems as a whole class, and write individual list poems in a variety of ways.  A first grade class is planning to use Photo Story for this project.
  • Book Spine Poetry:  Students in various grades will create a kind of found poem using books from the library shelves arranged in a stack to write poems using the titles on the spines.  Classes will photograph their stacks and record themselves reading their new poems.
  • Poetry Display:  5th grade has an autobiographical poetry and photography display on the media center shelves.  This project was a collaboration between the art teacher and the media center.
  • Poem in Your Pocket Day:  The official national poem in your pocket day is April 14th this year.  We’ll be celebrating on April 15th.  The media center will be transformed into a poetry cafe with tablecloths, special lighting, and an open mic for all classes to read both original poetry and favorite poems.
  • 1st Annual Poetry Contest:  Students in all grades PreK-5th can submit poems to our media center poetry contest.  A panel of judges will read and select the most creative poems at PreK-1st, 2nd-3rd, and 4th-5th grades.  Top poets will receive autographed books that I had autographed at the Decatur Book Festival, and other special poets will receive things such as pens, bookmarks, and other special trinkets donated from Borders.

Resource:

  • Poetry Tag Time:  For $0.99, you can download a creative e-book called Poetry Tag Time. The book features unpublished poems by top children’s poets.  Each poem is somehow connected to the one before it as each poet tags the next poet to write a new poem.  There is also a blog connected with the book.  You can also follow the Gotta Book Blog and Poetry for Children Blog, where free poems will be posted each day of poetry month.  This would also be a fun way to start a poetry project in your school among students or teachers.

Have fun this poetry month and feel free to share the exciting things going on in your library in the comments section of this post so that we can all continue to learn from one another about how to honor this genre of our collections.

Andy Plemmons

School Librarian
David C. Barrow Elementary
Athens, GA

http://www.clarke.k12.ga.us/webpages/aplemmons

Poetry Resources in GALILEO

Getting ready for National Poetry Month? Take a look at this post in the GALILEO Planet News for resources, activities, and lessons plans to help you share poetry with your students.

If you have questions or comments, please Contact Us.

Courtney McGough
GALILEO Support Services
Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia