Blog Archives

Free Webinars: Carterette Series Webinars for November 2011

The Georgia Library Association is pleased to announce the November 2011 session of the Carterette Series Webinars  (http://gla.georgialibraries.org/mediawiki/index.php/Carterette_Series_Webinars).

 

As of the upcoming session, the Carterette Series Webinars will be expanding in scope to include notable national speakers in addition to homegrown Georgia talent. As always, the series will continue to highlight trends, innovation, and best practices in libraries. Registration remains free and open to anyone, anywhere. Topics are chosen to be of interest to employees of all library types and each session is approved for one Georgia Continuing Education (CE) contact hour.

 

Can’t make it to the live show? That’s okay! The sessions will be recorded and available on the CSW site for later viewing. (http://gla.georgialibraries.org/mediawiki/index.php/Carterette_Series_Webinars)

 

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Presented by Michael Sauers

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

3:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. EASTERN STANDARD TIME

http://bit.ly/nidLQF

 

In this session Michael Sauers, the Nebraska Library Commission’s Technology Innovation Librarian, takes you on a tour of Google+, Google’s latest attempt at creating a social network. At only a few months old it already has more than 50 million users and was designed with privacy in mind from the beginning. Is Google+ a Facebook killer? Is it something you should be paying attention to? Should your library be there? Michael will give his answers to these questions and more.

 

Michael Sauers is currently the Technology Innovation Librarian for the Nebraska Library Commission in Lincoln, Nebraska and has been training librarians in technology for more than 15 years. He has also been a public library trustee, a bookstore manager for a library friends group, a reference librarian, serials cataloger, technology consultant, and bookseller. He earned his MLS in 1995 from the University at Albany’s School of Information Science and Policy. Michael’s tenth book, Blogging & RSS: A Librarian’s Guide, Second Edition was published in October 2010. He has also written dozens of articles for various journals and magazines. In his spare time he blogs at http://travelinlibrarian.info, runs Web sites for authors and historical societies, is past-chair of the Nebraska Library Association’s Information Technology and Access Round Table, takes many, many photos, and reads more than 100 books per year.

 

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Please contact a member of the Carterette Series Planning Team with questions or suggestions.

 

Karen Viars: karen.viars@gpc.edu

Tessa Minchew: tessa.minchew@gpc.edu

Sarah Steiner: ssteiner@gsu.edu

First Grade Apple Lesson

A first grade teacher and I teamed up for a lesson about apples.  The 2-day lesson included several read a louds about the life cycle of the apple tree and what wonderful things we get from apples, an apple tasting, making a class pictograph of your favorite kind of apple, how applesauce is made, and a homemade apple sauce tasting.

The first thing we did when the students came to the library is fill out a graphic organizer on the white board as a class—anything and everything the students could tell me about apples.  Then I read several books about apples and the apple harvest.  We revisited the graphic organizer to see if there was anything students wanted to add based on the information from the books we just read.

Next, we had an apple tasting.  Every student ate a piece of green apple, yellow apple, and red apple.  We discussed words like “sour” and “tart.”  Once each student decided on his/her favorite apple, they got a die-cut of their favorite apple and put it on the pictograph.  We then talked about the graph: what apple do students like the most?  What apple do students like the least?  How many more students like one kind of apple over another kind.

After the pictograph discussion, we talked about the steps involved in making applesauce.  All the ingredients were shown to the students. They got to smell the different spices, see how a peeler works, and see how a slow cooker works.  (When they smelled the spices, they made comments like: “That smells like my oatmeal.”  Cute!)

Rounding out the first day of the 2-day lesson, the students completed an apple book printed from Enchanted Learning.   Before leaving the library, they were told they would come back tomorrow to finish the lesson.  Several students cheered: “YAY!  We are coming back to the library tomorrow.”  You gotta love hearing that as a librarian!

At home that evening I peeled about 16 apples and put everything in the slow cooker to make the apple sauce.  The next morning, everything was ready!

When the students came in for the second day of everything apples, they were so excited!  We first reviewed things from the day before—we revisited the pictograph, we talked about the steps (in the correct order) of making applesauce, and we talked about all the facts they learned about apples and the life cycle of the apple tree.  Then everyone got a bowl of homemade applesauce.  Comments from the students: “Ms. Tigges, you are genius.”  “Ms.Tigges, you are a rock star.”  I was feeling the love!

The students enjoyed the lesson.  The students felt comfortable in the library. The students read non-fiction books.   Mission accomplished!

Now I hope to take this lesson and turn it into a Media Festival project with a few of the students.

Some age-appropriate apple books:

The Seasons of Arnold’s Apple Tree by Gail Gibbons

Apples Grow on a Tree by Mari Schuh

Picking Apples by Gail Saunders-Smith

Apples by Gail Gibbons

Apples by Ken Robbins

Apples by Elaine Landau

How Do Apples Grow? By Betsy Maestro

Seed, Sprout, Fruit: An Apple Tree Life Cycle by Shannon Knudsen

Apples, Apples, Apples by Nancy Elizabeth Wallace

Apples, Apples Everywhere!  Learning about Apple Harvests by Robin Koontz

 

Slow cooker apple sauce recipe:

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Spiced-Slow-Cooker-Applesauce/detail.aspx

Happy Harvesting!

Anja Tigges, Ed.S.

Librarian

William J. Scott Elementary School, Atlanta Public Schools

1752 Hollywood Road

Atlanta, GA 30318

404. 802. 7000

atigges@atlanta.k12.ga.us

Registration Is Open for the GLMA Summer Institute!

GLMA Summer Institute June 15-17, 2011

JOIN US FOR THE GLMA SUMMER INSTITUTE AT CALLAWAY GARDENS!

Summer Institute 2010 (photo by Susan Grigsby)

Registration is open for the GLMA Summer Institute, to be held June 15-17, 2011 at Callaway Gardens! The Summer Institute is a great opportunity for Georgia Media Specialists to get together to work, learn, earn one PLU credit, and network with friends throughout the state! The registration form and the prior approval form can be found on the GLMA website.

The Mountain Creek Inn is offering GLMA members a special price for June 15-17. This offer will expire on May 16, 2011. The rate will be $99/night plus tax and garden admission is included. Call 800-543-7121 for a reservation. Remember to ask for the GLMA Summer Institute Rate. Information about the facility can be found by visiting the Callaway Gardens website.

Summer Institute 2010 (photo by Susan Grigsby)

We look forward to seeing you at the Summer Institute. If you have any questions, please contact Amanda or Kathryn in the Executive Office or the Summer Institute Coordinator, Susan Grigsby.

Telling Your Library’s Story

Not so long ago, data were hard to come by.  As our society has become more and more infused with technology, data aren’t nearly as scarce as they used to be.  In school libraries, we have circulation statistics, site hits, classes taught, and the list goes on and on. There is no doubt that these data help us when we need to justify our programs to administrators and others. We can also use data to see trends, identify problems, and herald successes.

In between the infographics, statistics, and charts, lately I’ve noticed the call for stories. Stories are one of the main ways that we learn from and share with one another. Numbers can be informative, but they are all the more compelling when accompanied by a well-told story of a successful learning experience made possible by the school library.

April is School Library Month. AASL has adopted “Create Your Own Story” as the 2011 School Library Month theme. Students can use the library to find and tell stories, and we can tell our library’s stories as well.

If you’re not sure how to tell your library’s story, there are a number of resources that might help you think about how to start developing a collection of stories about your library.  Starting March 15, AASL is offering a free series about creating strategic stories to gain support for libraries. I also learn a lot about the power of effective stories from resources like StoryCorps, not to mention friendships with professional storytellers including Linda Martin and Stephanie Jones.

There are many ways to begin collecting stories, or add to the collection you’ve already started. You might grab a flip video camera for an interview. Record photographic evidence of student learning and audio record accompanying reflections. Encourage digital storytelling.

Of course, librarians can’t be the only ones telling positive stories about school library programs. When programs are in trouble, parents and other community members need to speak out on our behalf. Keep an email file with comments from parents and community members who have been enriched by your program. Include a “press” page on your website with links to local news stories about projects that include your school library.  If a crisis comes, you have ready resources to share efficiently.

Unfortunately, outside of the library community, there are too few people telling positive stories about what school libraries do.
I’ve seen calls for positive examples that aim to stretch beyond our usual conversations.  This is one way projects like the Learning4Life video contest and PC Sweeney’s Great Librarian Write Out! can inspire us to share stories in different ways and places.

As School Library Month approaches, take time to cultivate your library’s own story as you enhance student learning and storytelling.  Find interesting ways and unexpected places to tell that story.

Beth Friese

Ph.D. Candidate

Department of Language and Literacy Education

The University of Georgia

SAVE THE DATE: Summer Institute 2011

Dear Georgia Library Professionals!

GLMA’s Summer Institute 2011 has been scheduled for June 16 and 17, 2011 at beautiful Callaway Gardens! Rooms are being held at the Mountain Creek Inn for SI participants at last year’s rate of $99/night (single or double). This year’s theme is “Make it and Take it” and ALL participants will leave with lessons, programs, and products that can be used in the library/classroom.

Registration forms are not quite ready yet – we are in negotiations with Callaway to include breakfast in your conference fee. As soon as we have everything ironed out I will send out another email blast with everything you’ll need to register for Summer Institute. You can go ahead and reserve your room before officially registering if you’d like. I’m looking forward to an exciting conference in a lovely facility! Won’t you join me?


Susan Grigsby, Teacher-Librarian
Past-President, GLMA
Elkins Pointe Middle School
Roswell, Georgia

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