** GLMA Legislative Update **

The House Appropriations Education Subcommittee met this afternoon to pass the FY 2010 education budget.  A highlight of the meeting was an announcement made by Chairman Edward Lindsey (R – Atlanta) that the subcommittee was able to fully fund the National Board Certification salary incentive for 2010.
On a much different note, Chairman Lindsey stated that Republicans, Democrats, Representatives, Senators, teachers, and administrators would need to work together to give flexibility to the local systems to get the state through these difficult financial times.  One suggestion he made, that would be an effort to give local flexibility and potentially ward off teacher layoffs, is to furlough up to 6 teacher training days.  He noted this would be a short term impact, not affecting teacher’s retirement.  
Nothing regarding furloughs is set in stone at this time.  Like all other issues under the Gold Dome, GLMA members need to continue to reach out to Representatives and Senators.  Issues of concern to media specialists today are
HB 278 – Expenditure Control Waivers for 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 school years
Will be heard next in the Senate Education Committee.
To contact Senate Education Committee members, CLICK HERE.
HB 243 – Grandfathers in current NBC teachers and those in the pipeline as of 3/1/09 (original bill by the Governor eliminated the program)
Will be heard next in the Senate Education Committee.
To contact Senate Education Committee members, use the link above.
FY 2010 Budget – Concerns include keeping NBC salary incentive fully funded by the House
The full House has yet to vote on the FY 10 budget, but it’s not too early to begin working on the Senate.  Ask Senators to keep funding that the House restored to the NBC salary incentive intact.
To contact Senate Appropriations Committee members, CLICK HERE.
Stay tuned…
Lasa & Michelle

Michelle Crider
JLH Consulting
2711 Irvin Way, Suite 111
Decatur, GA 30030
404.299.7700 Phone
404.299.7029 Fax

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Posted on March 17, 2009, in Communications. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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